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20130113
20130113
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concerns in that regard for the afghan people. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already in the -- called for the strategic partnership agreement between us and the united states have given their approval to this relationship and they value it as one that is good for afghanistan. so in that context the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve and i'm sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about. during our conversations and perhaps many times in that conversation beginning with the conversation of course i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that
to take care of the environment. >> and our response to that s we have no problem with the protection of the environment and wettelands but if it is a public good the entire public should have to pay for it. you shouldn't force one property owner to bear the entire burden of playing for that. >> shannon: to get the permit that he wants to fix the land. do you you feel like you you have is taken on something that is a bigger fight for all americans, all landowners. >> definitely. this affects, of course, not only us and we are in the final stages but it affects any one in the state of florida who owns property. and as far as that goes in this country who owns property because if you assuming that we do come through this successfully it will at least hopefully stop this flood of government regulation and taking land. >> shannon: at this point do you feel like it is a fair fight, the individual land own oar versus the government? do you feel like there is a balance of powethere or not? >> if i had warren buffett's money it would be fair. there are two aspects. number one the financial an
attacks, the united states is susceptible to that environment. it's not only here in the united states but u.s. interests around the world. and that's why the u.s. has to maintain or believes it has to maintain that presence there. there's no doubt that going forward many of these issues are going to come to the surface. afghanistan could find itself in a very bloody civil war. iraq after the u.s. withdrawal has not gotten necessarily better. there's still violence. there are still attacks. but to some extent u.s. interests are a little more secured as a result of what happened there in the eyes of, you know, the united states officials that pursued that war. so again, you could make the argument that in afghanistan something similar could happen. but there's no doubt a great deal of uncertainty, great deal of questions remain. as to whether or not the central government in afghanistan can actually control the military and preserve the security, integrity of that country. and that remains to be seen. >> if only we could predict the future. all right, ayman, good to see you. >> thanks a
a proper environment in which to do their jobs and that will include making sure that don't ask, don't tell and elimination of don't ask, don't tell is fully implemented. >> with regard to the military budget, he has called the military a bloated organization. chairman of the joint chiefs, martin dempsey, said this week that we are on the brink of creating a hollow force. would a secretary of defense hagel pro-provide over the hollowing out of the defense department? >> the biggest concern with respect to who will league out is this sequester that's hanging like a sword over the department. that's what they had tried -- have to not let that happen but with respect to going in and finding things within the department of defense that perhaps you don't need or you can eliminate, if that's what you mean by bloat, i hope he does find bloat and gets rid of it. >> agree with his characterization that it's bloated? >> bloated doesn't necessarily mean the whole department is bloated. bloated mean there is are probably things in the department that you can take a hard look at and determine whether or
extent. the uncertainty of it all fascinated me, as does my environment, just by nature. so the book ends up being very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth, and how over time, it changes. the same substance, stone, rock, water, wood, guess from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat, and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality, all the way. from childhood lower, immortal, to our elder years, where we become the archive, where we become the thing which holds so many people we have lost and is what survives. memory is what survives, and within that memory, the afterlife of so much. so, thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago i certainly did not expect i would end up here, or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think everything we have heard so far is a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never h
been in that environment. he had a wife and i think two children. he is representative of the force. and if you think not just to the service member but of the wife. the spousal husband whos ever back with the children with repetitive years gone, repetitive stresses and strains. they're an extraordinarily professional force. to my knowledge this is the first time we fought a lengthy war with a completely professional force. we don't really know the long term impact. it's held together well but there are a lot of disturbing numbers like suicides which worries me a lot. >> schieffer: it seems to me that we are asking a military to do more than it is designed to do. and people are talking about reducing the size of the military but it seems to me if we're going to ask the same of the military that we're asking now, we actually need a larger military. and i don't think that's going to happen. >> well, i would take it in a slightly different direction. we are asking the same military but i'm not sure it's a military that the american people know. most of us see a soldier or sailor airma
. [video clip] >> we are all products of our experience and environment. i have been tempered by the experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy and military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose in power. no question much of the questioning i have done about iraq and was tempered by the experience in vietnam. whenever i will ever do in my life -- whatever i will do in my life, those experiences shaped me, just like anyone who has gone through war. those experiences shape you very much. it makes you less inclined to jump into war. it is easy to get into war, not very easy to get out, as evidenced by the johnson tapes. you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important, especially in the complicated world we live in today. i think something else is important here and a lesson we learned from vietnam. what is going to be very important for america is not to isolate ourselves in the wo
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)